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Co-Addiction Free

with Addie Lee

My Blog

Blog

Living in Denial: Refusing to get New Information

Posted on October 17, 2014 at 5:13 PM
I am discovering that those who are affected by addiction, whether as a co-dependent or an alcoholic/drug addict, or personnel who are involved in the treatment field, live in the world of "Denial". The co may prefer not to admit that s/he is/was influened by the behaviors of the alcoholic/drug addict to others with the exception of sharing  their discomfort with a support group. The alcoholic/addict finds it too painful to concede that his/her behavior negativelyaffected their loved ones and prefers not to face that fact. As Chemical Dependency Counselor, Alice Lebron, states "They are victims of the "Dry Drunk" because they do not take the steps to change their behaviors caused by the drinking/using and thus remain in this state rarely making their amends to their famiily and friends for the problems their illness has caused. The treatment centers refuse to look at any new information about the disease and the recovery process but cling to 40 years of "tried and true" facts re the illness of alcoholism/addiction. I am also finding that recovery bookstores that contain volumes of old, well-known books published in the 70's and 80's are not receptive to adding titles that contain new information, donning the attitude "Everyone has their story" basically saying that keeping an open mind to new facts is of no interest because everything about the field has already been discovered and published. So how do new, legitimate facts become known to those affected when the person in charge assumes this "closed mind" attitude, failing to make them available? This is the quandary that I am faced with as I share or try to share the facts about co-dependency, alcoholism/drug addiction and recovery that can add value and hope for those struggling in their quest for a  healthy life without addiction. It is indeed troubling that the "helping field" and those connected with it prefer to turn a blind eye to receiving updated news which would assist the co-addicted and addicted person.  How does this position live up to the purposes of a twelve-step program's motto "We are Responsible. When anyone, anywhere reaches out for help, we want to be there and for that: We are Responsible"? If anyone has the answer to that question, I welcome your insight and enlightenment. 

Good Karma, Everyone!

Categories: Denial

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